Finding Recycled Eyeglasses

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Inspired by our Summer 2016 issue of the Green American on recycling, editorial fellow Ilana Berger investigated why and how to buy recycled eyeglass frames. Here’s what she discovered…. A few weeks ago, I went to LensCrafters with my mom to help her pick out a new pair of glasses. Having been blessed with 20/20 vision, I had never been glasses […]

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The Truth About Bottled Water

Did you know? trash covers up to 40% of the ocean surface. 90% is plastic. water bottles can break down into little pieces covering entire beaches.

Guest post from Alexandra Beane, Wheels For Wishes The United States is the world’s largest consumer of bottled water. In 2011, the United States set a record for purchasing 9.1 billion gallons of bottled water nationwide, which is equal to 29.2 gallons per person. Unfortunately, only 27 percent of plastic water bottles are recycled in the United States, and they are […]

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BPA Substitute May Be Toxic to the Human Brain

BPA-free labels may indicate the presence of BPS. Ask the manufacturer if you're unsure

Bisphenol-A (BPA) gained notoriety in the 1990s as scientists studies began to draw lines between its use in many types of consumer plastics and hormone disruption, which can lead to problems with brain and nervous system development, obesity, and cancer. Today, manufacturers often turn to bisphenol-S (BPS) as a substitute that’s intended to be less toxic. However, researchers at the […]

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Review a Green Business for Your Chance to Win $100 in Recycled-Plastic Kitchen Products

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When you register and write a review for any green business listed in the National Green Pages® between now and February 29, you’ll be entered for a chance to win $100 worth of kitchen products and tableware made of 100% recycled plastic from Preserve®, member of Green America‘s Green Business Network™. This prize consists of the Kitchen Starter Set in apple-green (three mixing bowls, […]

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11 Easy Ways to Kick the Plastic Habit

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 Replace common single-use plastics with these sturdy reusables, recommended by MyPlasticFreeLife.com‘s Beth Terry and the editors of the Green American.   1. Instead of accepting plastic bags at the grocery store, carry your own cloth grocery and produce bags. Choose stretchy string bags that carry many times their weight (ReuseIt.com), paper-thin organic cotton produce bags (BlueLotusGoods.com, EcoBags.com), compact recycled nylon […]

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Life Without Plastic (our January 2012 green-biz interview)

Jay and Beth

With backgrounds in law, business ethics, management, biochemistry and ecotoxicology, Chantal Plamondon and Jay Sinha made a life-changing decision after their son was born in 2003. They started looking for ways to reduce their family’s toxin exposure in everyday life, and when they began to discover the problems with everyday plastic, their difficult search for stainless steel or glass baby […]

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20 Plastic Things You Didn’t Know You Can Recycle

1) Bottle and jar caps: Weisenbach Recycled Products accepts clean plastic bottlecaps, plastic jar caps, flip-top caps from personal care products, and flexible snap-on lids (e.g. butter tub lids) to turn into funnels and other items. CapsCando.com. 2) Brita pitcher filters: Preserve’s Gimme 5 program accepts Brita-brand pitcher filters for recycling. See #11 below. 3) Compostable bioplastics: Find a municipal composter at FindaComposter.com. 4) Computers and other electronics: Find the most responsible recyclers near you at e-stewards.org/find-a-recycler. Your local Best Buy store will also accept many types of electronics, large and small—from televisions and gaming systems to fans and alarm clocks. Best Buy partners with responsible recyclers that do not ship items overseas, including Green Business Network™ member Electronic Recyclers International. You can bring three small items per day to Best Buy for free. The company charges a fee to recycle large electronics. BestBuy.com/recycling.

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