Progress in the Fight against Payday Loans

Across the country, countless Americans have trouble making payments on housing, auto loans, and healthcare, as well as affording food and other basic necessities. Many people throughout the country are strapped for cash, and the payday loan industry is devouring what little savings they have left. Although they’re advertised almost anywhere you go, most people don’t know how payday loans work. When someone needs cash to pay a bill or cover an unforeseen expense, a lender can give them the funds they need to meet their obligations. As with most loans, borrowers will pay back the amount they received plus interest. The caveat with payday loans, however, is that the interest rates applied are absurdly high; often as much as 200-300%. Very few borrowers seem to appreciate the gravity of an interest rate that high – and even those who do often feel they have no other recourse. By the time the payment on a loan is due, the added interest typically exceeds the balance of the borrower’s account; they now have no money in the bank, which is the reason the loan was taken out in the first place. By handing out more cash to cover the original debt plus late and overdraft fees, payday lenders continue to rope in long-term customers. These small, yet high-interest payday loans, or “deposit advances,” as big banks have come to call them, trap consumers in a perpetual cycle of debt that is […]

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What Do Your Credit Card Charges Support?

Cash or credit? In 2012, purchase volume in the United States from credit card companies Visa, MasterCard, American Express, and Discover totaled close to $2.1 trillion. Of these $2.1 trillion worth of transactions, cardholders’ issuing banks collect 1-3% in the form of an interchange fee. While 1-3% of the cost of a sandwich at Subway for lunch may seem negligible to you, consider all of the other people in the same restaurant using their credit cards, multiplied by the number of locations across the country, multiplied by the number of lunches each person purchases each year, and so on. If we crunch the numbers, we can deduce that credit-issuing megabanks collect between $20.5 billion and $61.4 billion each year on credit card transactions. The majority of that money goes to the 10 largest credit card issuing banks in the U.S. It’s difficult to believe that just a few institutions get to divvy up such large sums of money amongst themselves, especially when the individual charges to an everyday person’s credit card go largely unnoticed. As you might guess, those billions of dollars pay for high salaries and bonuses, and finance lending to fossil fuel polluters and other destructive industries around the globe. Let’s think for a minute about just how much money large banks amass from the collective totals of millions of miniscule charges, and how that money could be used to fund projects that could add real benefit to […]

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