Credit Cards 101: Responsible Credit Cards for Young Green Americans

According to a recent poll, 34% of Americans aged 18 to 50 do not have a credit card. For most young people, the word “finance” conjures up little more than images of suits on Wall St and a dangerously low checking account balance. Fears of crippling debt (often the result of massive student loans), predatory mega-banks, and identity theft deter us from applying for a credit card. Paying for all of your expenses with cash is a responsible option, and it is entirely possible to live a life without credit. There are, however, many advantages to educating yourself about credit cards and using them wisely. They’re small, convenient, and easy to monitor, and they allow us to accomplish a range of activities that we couldn’t with just cash or a debit card. Here are a few examples: –          Housing – Before you sign a lease on a house or apartment, your landlord will want to check your credit as a gauge of how good you are at paying your bills. If you have bad credit or no credit, a landlord will be very wary of renting their property to you. Utilities companies also use credit as a gauge of financial responsibility. Even if you can convince a landlord to rent you their property, convincing the electric utility to turn on your power without good credit could be a real challenge. –          Employment – Employers may check candidates’ credit to judge […]

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A New Years Resolution Green Americans can Get Behind

Though the holiday season is full of friends, family, and good food, the prospect of a New Year’s resolution looms like an important deadline. Whether it’s taking steps to improve your personal health or checking an item off of your bucket list, our brains tend to resist serious changes when faced with periods of comfort, satisfaction, and routine. There’s plenty of science behind this too – researchers have substantial evidence that we are at odds with our desire to change our behavior. According to a survey of 3,000 people conducted by UK psychologist Richard Wiseman, 88% of proposed New Year’s resolutions resulted in failure. An experiment conducted by Baba Shiv of Stanford University further illustrates the point. Students were split into two groups and told to remember either a two-digit number, or a seven-digit number. With their assigned number in mind, the students were then told to walk down the hallway where they were presented with a choice of snacks: either chocolate cake or fruit salad. Shiv found that the students trying to remember a seven-digit number were almost twice as likely to choose the chocolate cake over the fruit salad. So while you’re wrapping up end-of-the year projects at work or finishing final exams at school, there is evidence to support that a mind with a high cognitive load often makes poor choices. Many New Year’s resolutions involve significant willpower and commitment – like starting a diet or an […]

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