New Congress Supports Wall Street, Not the Public

capitol

Congress began a new session at the beginning of 2015, with the Democrats in the House of Representatives handing the reins over to the Republicans. Though the previous Congress wasn’t exactly known for being tough on Wall Street, the recent bill proposed by Representative Michael Fitzpatrick (R-PA) was a predictable giveaway to large financial institutions by way of slashing regulations […]

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Alert! Omnibus Spending Bill Favors Wall Street and Wealthy Donors

Dolla dolla bill

Congressional Democrats, in an attempt to prevent another government shutdown this year, may agree to let some troubling provisions into this year’s omnibus spending bill. Among the concessions made to the newly GOP-controlled legislature, the bill would strip critical restrictions on Wall Street under the Dodd-Frank Act. It would also permit a 3-fold increase in the amount of money a […]

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Update – US Banks Still Investing Heavily in Coal

Coal

Banktrack.org released an updated review of various financial institutions’ holdings in dirty coal energy. Green America promoted a scorecard earlier this year outlining the banks that were the strongest supporters of coal extraction and electricity production. The lowest marks went to Wells Fargo (D+), Bank of America (D-), Citi (F) and Chase (F). Of course, each of these banks has […]

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GWU Invests in Washington, DC Communities

http://www.freeimages.com/photo/1225847

Settled in the heart of the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of downtown Washington, DC, the George Washington University is characterized by its diverse student body, robust international affairs and political science programs, and high cost of attendance. Tuition fees go towards everything from funding events on campus space to acquiring new properties, but the institution was never known for its commitment […]

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Bank of America Reaches Record Settlement with Justice Department, and Taxpayers Cover the Costs

Over the past year, the Justice Department has reached multiple settlements with the country’s largest financial institutions regarding their involvement in the 2008 financial crisis. JP Morgan Chase forked over $13 billion this past November, Citigroup settled for $7 billion this July, and now Bank of America will pay a record $16.65 to the DOJ. While all of these settlements involved the sale of toxic mortgage-backed securities to unknowing investors, the recent case is different. Under the guise of providing relief to homeowners who have lost their houses, BofA will actually stick the taxpayer with a bill of up to $5.8 billion for their wrongdoings. The settlement, reached last Thursday, is unique in that it actually allows Bank of America to write-off most of the cost as a tax deduction. Previous settlements with similar large banks contained more restrictions on this practice, but BofA will be able to treat the payment as if it were just another operating cost, for tax purposes. Approximately $5 billion of the grand total is considered a “civil penalty.” Typically, money paid to resolve a civil penalty cannot be written off as a business expense, but a tenth circuit court ruled earlier this month that businesses may write off penalties such as these as a “compensatory cost.” If Bank of America doesn’t try to write off these $5 billion of civil penalties, the other $11.63 billion portion of the settlement will still stick the taxpayer […]

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